Method of relative dating

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Knowing which events came before or after others allows scientists to analyze the relationships between the events.

For example, archaeologists might date materials based upon relative depth of burial in a site.

Once the organism dies, the Carbon-14 begins to decay at an extremely predictable rate.

The earliest-known hominids in East Africa are often found in very specific stratigraphic contexts that have implications for their relative dating.They do not, however, give "absolute" dates because they merely provide a statistical probability that a given date falls within a certain range of age expressed in years.Chronometric methods include radiocarbon, potassium-argon, fission-track, and thermoluminescence.The most common relative dating method is stratigraphy.Other methods include fluorine dating, nitrogen dating, association with bones of extinct fauna, association with certain pollen profiles, association with geological features such as beaches, terraces and river meanders, and the establishment of cultural seriations.

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